Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Unused Control Devices

 

The CSA Standards outline requirements for operator controls on equipment.  One of the requirements that is often overlooked is that any unused control devices need to have a bypass for their function.  Particularly in older machines this can be lacking.

Take for example a piece of equipment that could be operated by both foot and hand controls.  These are separate control stations and are used independently of each other depending on the type of work being performed.  What this means is that there needs to be some method for selecting either hand or foot controls, or when one is selected, the other is bypassed.  Also a machine could have two sets of controls, one for each operator.  When one set of controls is not needed (as when the machine is operated by only one operator) the second set of controls shall be bypassed.

bypass controls

When this is not in place, the risk to the operator is increased by the potential that when they are working on the machine, the other controls could be activated and cause an unplanned start.  They could be in a vulnerable position, exposed to the hazards, and not expecting the machine to start.  The other controls could be activated by another operator, or even accidentally by the main operator.

Another example is that many machines have remote pendants that allow for manual fine movements (jog)of the machine.  Operators take control of these pendants and get close to the hazard to make fine movements for setup.  When these pendants are active, it’s important that any of the other controls for the machine are not active and have been bypassed.

If you have potential multiple control points on your machine and want to ask a question about if they are bypassed correctly, give us a call or email.

Posted by Kristin Petaski at 12:56 PM 0 Comments